The denim industry is just not a business. It's a pride business when it comes to revolutionary changes, which affects the entire industry.  Same as some companies in San Francisco Loudest voices in the struggle for equality, especially for their LGBT workers and neighbours, but one organization has really brought this advocacy into the fabric of its community. 

So many brands were helping for LGBT rights. But levis was a no.1 who was there in the market from the last 163 years but This clothing company in the LGBT community has made a name for itself. As part of our unique publication Business of Pride, we are looking at the groundbreaking moments when the denim industry wasn't waiting for others to be the first. This includes being the first to donate money and resources during the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and signing on to the marriage equality amicus brief.

While many people know that Levi's was a strong supporter of LGBT equality, their civil rights activism can be traced back to the 1940s when they integrated factories in the Bay Area, and the 1950s and 60s when they integrated their facilities in the South, at a period when it was highly unpopular. When we approach the one-year anniversary of the marriage equality decision of the Supreme Court, it is important to remember the long road it took to get here and also to realize that we did not reach the finish line.

The stories of LGBTQ America are, in large part, stories of civil rights denied, fought for, fought against, won, lost, won again, and threatened. Broadly, civil rights are understood as freedoms of life, safety, thought and conscience, speech, expression, the press, assembly, and movement as well as the right to privacy and protection from discrimination. These struggles have touched almost every facet of LGBTQ life, and mention of them can be found in every chapter of this theme study. It is not possible to identify people as LGBTQ just by looking at them; it is through the political act of coming out claiming an LGBTQ.